Displaced Gazans react to ceasefire plan adopted by UN Security Council

A Palestinian looks at the aftermath of the Israeli bombing in Nuseirat refugee camp, Gaza Strip, onJune 8, 2024.
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Gaza

Exhausted by 8 months of war and forced displacements, Palestinians in Gaza welcomed Tuesday (Jun. 10) the approval of a ceasefire plan by the UN security council.

The plan in three phases would begin with a cease-fire and the swap of hostages and prisoners.

“here have been several attempts at a cease-fire and we hope that it will be implemented by all parties, and that no party will oppose it,” a Gazan says.

“It is enough, we are tired. The situation cannot be described. We are tired. Enough of the wars. Our children were killed, and we did not see our family, our nephews, our brothers, our relatives, and the people dearest to us. They are all gone. We have no one but God,” another resident said.

The resolution adopted on Monday (Jun. 10) by the Security Council calls on Israel and Hamas “to fully implement the plan’s terms without delay and without condition.”

READ ALSO: Gaza war: UN Security Council adopts US ceasefire plan

The proposal was announced by U.S. President Joe Biden last month. He presented it as an Israeli proposal, but Israeli PM Netanyahu has publicly disputed key aspects of it, saying Israel won’t end the war without destroying Hamas and achieving the return of all the hostages.

Hamas supports the broad outline of the agreement but has demanded assurances it will be implemented. The militant group embraced a similar proposal last month that was rejected by Israel.

“Efforts are continuing to study and clarify some matters to ensure implementation by the Israeli side,” Hamas spokesman Jihad Taha said Tuesday (Jun. 12). Israel “has not given clear approval or commitments to implementation that would lead to ending the aggression,” he said.

The Israeli operation Swords of Iron has killed over 37,000 Palestinians, mostly women and children.

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